“You don’t make art, you find it” ― Pablo Picasso  
When Shooting with Intent at street, I often look for frames within my frame when positioning my subjects. This element can not be understated, it can be a very simple but strong device when used well. Frames can be simple or more complex. Doorways or windows are the most obvious frames, but smaller frames within art galleries can work also.. There are no rules about using them, they are simply a device to add emphasis or impact to your composition. Frames can be in the foreground or in the background. They can add depth and lead your eye directly to your subject. The interesting thing I have found, is that the more you look for frames the more you find them. They are everywhere and the challenge of course, is to use them creatively. These are three of my favourite examples from Rome.


This was taken inside the Vatican Museum, so much Art so little time. I enjoy the echoes of the man and the statue. The subject is backlit and framed by the window which adds emphasis.

This image always makes me smile. I enjoy the humour of lady dangling over a wall and the ladder in the background seems to be misplaced. The frame here is used to add emphasis to my subject and provide natural contrast.

In this final image there are two frames, the doorway and the window. This image seems to be all about the waiting and the boredom.  I enjoy the invisible lines of sight, all three women seem to be both connected and disconnected at the same time.

So next time you are out at street, look at frames and how to use them in your compositions. The more we analyse these elements the more aware we become of these devices, and the more they appear in our work.

T

Any thoughts?

 

Comments (1)

  1. Hi Teresa, what do you think about multiframing through the glass world?! I usually can’t resist to those 3D compositions. kind regards

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